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Building Anticipation Skills

Updated: Dec 16, 2021

Benefits of teaching anticipation skills

  • Promote communication skills, shared attention, listening skills, asking for 'more', 'again' or 'help'

  • Teach patience and how to 'wait'

  • Turn-taking

  • Teaches deferred rather than instant gratification

Click Clack Track

  • A must have in any sensory kit!

  • A Click Clack Track promotes the development of fine motor skills and hand-eye coordination, visual tracking and communication skills as the cars race down the colourful tracks.

  • Why stick to cars? Roll a Malteser down the ramp (or blueberries/grapes for a healthy alternative!)





Bubbles

  • A low cost activity that provide a wonderfully relaxing sensory experience.

  • Bubbles promote visual tracking skills and hand-eye coordination, develop mouth muscles, language, communication and gross motor skills as the individual reach and jump to 'pop' the bubbles.

Make a bubble snake

  1. Cut the bottom off a clean plastic bottle and discard.

  2. Cover with opposite end to the neck of the bottle with a cloth and secure with an elastic band.

  3. Dip the cloth end into bubble mixture.

  4. Hold the bottle and blow through the neck of the bottle to create your 'bubble snake!

Jack in a Box

  • A Jack in a Box is a wonderful activity to experience shared attention promoting fine motor skills and hand-eye coordination as the individual turns the handle. It promotes communication skills, encouraging vocalisations and the opportunity to explore how items work through cause and effect.

  • Model language using words like 'wind', 'pop', 'hello', 'goodbye'

Make a 'real life' Jack in the Box.

  • All you need is a cardboard box! (Get out the paints and crayons and decorate it.)

  • The individual crouches inside the box and either covers themselves with a blanket or gently folds the cardboard flaps over their head.

  • They then wait to jump! This could be to the cue of music (when the music stops...up they jump), you could count them down '3...2...1' or give instructions to 'Jump' or even say 'hello' and 'goodbye'.



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Health & Safety Advice & Disclaimer


Please Read Before Engaging in any of the Activities


  • ​The author has used their best efforts in preparing the information on this website and makes no representation or warranties with respect to the accuracy, applicability, fitness or completeness to the contents.

  • The information is for pleasure purposes only.

  • If you wish to apply any ideas and activities contained in this blog, on the website or in any of the multisensory stories or resources, you are wholly responsible and take full responsibility for your actions.

  • ​The activities are designed to be led and supervised by a responsible adult at all times.

​​A Note on Allergies/Intolerances


  • ​If you have any doubts regarding any activity or prop used, then seek advice before starting.​

  • ​Be aware of potential choking hazards.

  • Check the ingredients in any items you may be using for any potential food or skin allergies or respiratory reactions. If you see any signs of redness, swelling or other symptoms of a suspected reaction seek immediate medical advice.

  • The interactions should be led by the sensory explorer who should be allowed to participate without expectation.

  • ​Never force stimuli and stop the activity if the story explorer shows signs that they are not enjoying the session.

Your questions, queries, comments and feedback are always welcome!

Contact me via email

rhymingmultisensorystories@outlook.com

or send me a message via social media:)





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